86 Ranger Stalls When Warm


turmanator

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88 bronco II chugging when warm

Hey, my 88 bronco II XLT seems to have the same problems you all are. replaced the tfi about 2 years ago (sat for a year) cap, wires, starter solenoid, and map (within the past year and 1/2), pcv, ECT sensor, fuel pump relay, tps, cleaned the throttle body, new fuel filters, cleaned the injectors within the past month or so,

i pass on all codes KOEO but am getting a code 21 KOER but i just replaced the ECT, i am at a loss. I took a 450 mile trip with no problem until the last hill dropped me from 75 to 55 acting like it was starving for gas but it kept going, pulled over (had to piss) and it died on me than wouldnt start for another 15 minutes, would just turn over, and ever since everytime i drive 20 minutes it does the same thing, i can slowly put the pedal down but if i try taking off pushing the pedal 1/4 of the way it acts like it starves, only when its warm.

It idled fine for about an hour with no hesitation. my gas tank is rusty but the filter didnt seem to be clogged when i pulled it. Any thoughts would be appreciated
 


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turmanator

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also it runs rich, it always has since ive owned it, but doesnt blow black smoke
 

Rocinante

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I have both an 88 (340,000 miles) and 89 (150,000 miles), both 2.9, 5 speed, rwd.

The 88 had run fine in normal weather, but in 90F + days it was fine on the road but would die in traffic for the past 2-3 years, 20 mins later would start up. I was never able to fully diagnose, but did manage to learn, by depressing the Schrader valve, that there was vapor in the fuel rail.*1 I believe too that icing or pouring water in the fuel rail when that happened caused it to start immediately. Like I said, I never fully diagnosed because it was so intermittent a problem, now not a problem because I retired the 88 and am melding it into the handsome and rust free 89.

The 89 had the same- but different problem. As soon as the engine fully warmed, as in after a 3-4 mile drive, it died. Changing the fuel pump, filter didn't do the trick. It died again so I put my $20 Harbor Freight pressure guage on the fuel rail, tucked it under the windshield wiper and verified that I had no fuel pressure problem.
Next- I swapped the ignition control module, the TPI-IV that is attached to the distributor.*2 So far, so good so I'm 99% sure I got it.

*1 The fuel lines can't vapor lock as previously mentioned, but the rail itself, which is a one way dead end road to the injectors can. I have no idea why but someone said it may have to do with metal to metal contact of injectors to rail which is supposed to be insulated by O rings.

*2 The TPI-IV isn't hard to change- and contrary to Chilton's, there is absolutely NO NEED to remove the distributor. The 2 mounting screws (which may be covered with plastic caps) can be removed using a 7/32" deep socket, pull down to disengage the 3 electrical spade connectors.
 

jmota25

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I know this post is very old but I wanted to put this on for anyone else that was having the same problem.

I have a 94 ford ranger, would idle roughly and would die on hotter days after driving it around for a short period. After it stalled I could not get it started unless I let it cool down for about 15 minutes or so. I tried changing the Ignition control module, changed the fuel pump even though it seemed to be working fine, and even took out the catalytic converter just in case. Could not solve the problem. Well I finally decided to check the timing belt and noticed that it had jumped time by one tooth. After replacing the belt and correcting the timing issue, the truck no longer idled roughly and would not die. So before you spend all the money to replace the ICM or fuel pump, give the timing belt a look to see if it has moved. Would have saved me some money and a whole lot of time.
 

Spott

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I know this post is very old but I wanted to put this on for anyone else that was having the same problem.

I have a 94 ford ranger, would idle roughly and would die on hotter days after driving it around for a short period. After it stalled I could not get it started unless I let it cool down for about 15 minutes or so. I tried changing the Ignition control module, changed the fuel pump even though it seemed to be working fine, and even took out the catalytic converter just in case. Could not solve the problem. Well I finally decided to check the timing belt and noticed that it had jumped time by one tooth. After replacing the belt and correcting the timing issue, the truck no longer idled roughly and would not die. So before you spend all the money to replace the ICM or fuel pump, give the timing belt a look to see if it has moved. Would have saved me some money and a whole lot of time.
If you have a timing belt, you do not have a 2.9l engine.

Unfortunately, your advice is inapplicable to the engines we're discussing.

I think you may be in the wrong sub-forum.
 

AddamJohn

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Very late to the game on this one. Hopefully I can help.
I bought an 86 Ranger RC Long Bed 2.9 2wd Auto with 100k on it for a fishing/camping rig. Cleaned the connections in the distributor cap and replaced all the plugs and wires after it was having trouble starting in wet weather and it ran great for a year. Took it all over the state and camped with it.
Then this year it started doing the exact thing everyone is describing in this thread. Wouldn't last long in hot weather and would fire up again after 15-20 min and go another 20-30 min before it would die (dramatically) again.
My dad and I replaced a long list of things: fuel filter, filter in the relay, fuel pump, ignition module, coil box, etc. and were about to give up and get an 05 4x4 when my uncle told me he had an 86 bronco with the same specs that did the same thing in 89 when it was only 2 years old and under warranty so the dealership went through it with a fine tooth comb and it was the pick up wire in the bottom of the distributor. We replaced the entire distributor to be safe and I can pretty surely say it worked. I've taken it on multiple trips this summer, up to 3 hours away, and haven't had any problems.
Now to fix all the other little things.
Love this truck. The 7ft bed is great. Other than trying to find toppers for it.
Good Luck!
 

Locotomb

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It’s your o2 sensor. While it’s warming up the electronic control system is in open loop. When it reaches temp, the Ecm goes to closed loop and utilizes the o2 sensor, which is reading lean and flooding your engine. Or vise versa. Change your o2 sensor. The sensor maintains whatever the reading was when it goes bad...rich or lean. Furthermore, the open loop strategy does not read from the o2 sensor. It reads from predetermined tables programmed to the Ecm.
 

Locotomb

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Engine Size
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2WD / 4WD
2WD
Total Lift
4inch custom fab lift/86
Total Drop
3 inch drop beams/88
Tire Size
31/10.5/15x10
Also, when your module goes out, everything will die. Example, driving down the road and your truck just shuts off. Both of these issues I’ve delt with, and luckily I didn’t throw a bunch of money at the problem. (Probably cause I don’t have any.) Took a day to figure out though.
 


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