88 Ranger 2.9 fuel pressure issues??


CzyRanger

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Hi Fellas!
New to the group here. Was recommended by a friend of mine. Okay... Where to start... I bought a 88 Ford Ranger XLT 4x4 2.9 and upon driving it home I realized that after driving for about 3 miles it would lose power... Back fire and go about a Max of 35 while floored. I would pull it over and let it cool for about ten minutes and then it went back to doing the same thing after about another 2-3 miles. So the guy who owned it replaced the fuel pump and all in the tank which he cut a hole in the bed and I can see it's new. So I ran a fuel pressure test on it and am at 40 PSI with the key on engine off. At idle I'm at about 32 PSI. I replaced the high pressure pump... The filter. Also replaced the distributor and ignition control module and timed it before I did the fuel pressure test. Anyway... All this with no change to the fuel psi. Today I removed the black canister fuel filter on the rail behind the high pressure fuel pump and it had no filter in it. I'm really at a loss as to what to do at this point. The one thing that I feel I can safely say is that the loss of power etc. doesn't happen again until she is warmed up. I also did unplug the vacuum line on the fuel pressure regulator and it went to 40 PSI idling and was steady even when reving. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks fellas!
 


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Paulos

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Your fuel pressure is okay. The fuel canister/reservoir on '86's and some '87's had filters, but I seriously doubt your '88 would've. Have you pulled codes from the ECM? If the truck sat for a while you could have clogged injectors (thanks to ethanol).
 

CzyRanger

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Your fuel pressure is okay. The fuel canister/reservoir on '86's and some '87's had filters, but I seriously doubt your '88 would've. Have you pulled codes from the ECM? If the truck sat for a while you could have clogged injectors (thanks to ethanol).
Thanks for the reply Paulo's...
Please see the attached video. Thanks again!
 

CzyRanger

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Also wanted to add that the cats were cut off. I believe the video I uploaded above is code 41? Thanks fellas!
 
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Paulos

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Code 41 indicates an O2 sensor issue. It could be the O2 sensor, or something else causing it to run lean. Hopefully it's just the O2 sensor (a quick fix).
 

CzyRanger

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Code 41 indicates an O2 sensor issue. It could be the O2 sensor, or something else causing it to run lean. Hopefully it's just the O2 sensor (a quick fix).
@Paulos
I was told to unplug the 02 sensor and see if conditions change... Which they did not. But I also noticed a few symptoms that I'd like to be considered. (Video below) Please let me know if anything makes sense to you. Couple notes... I can see the previous owners installed a new master cylinder on the brake booster. Also, with her Idling and warmed up... I'm reading 33psi fuel pressure btw.
 
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The brake pedal in my 88 Bronco 2 is somewhat firm when pressing it down too, and when somewhat cold still the idle goes up when I press the brake pedal down, I think it has something to do with a vacuum leak in the brake booster. As far as the fuel issues I have no idea engine diagnostics have never been my thing LOL.
 

PetroleumJunkie412

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Code 41 can be a bear.

Please read:


You're on the right track. Odds are it's either an O2 issue, an O2 wiring issue, or a vacuum leak. If it is O2, I had good luck with the Bosch ones Rock Auto carries before I went to a Wideband (your 1988 cannot use a Wideband without an aftermarket pcm - don't buy one).

The brake thing really points to vacuum. Pcv valve, air box heater lines, cruise control (if you have it, there's also a cruise control vac line under your brake pedal), brake booster grommets, oil fill cap, fuel tank charcoal canister, fuel tank vapor line... List goes on. Start at your intake plenum and look EVERYWHERE. I'd put money on a missing vac cap or a cracked hose. Plenum gasket is even a possibility.

Lean means either you're not getting enough fuel, or too much air foe the fuel your pcm is injecting. Three things make "vrooms:" air, fuel, spark. If you know you're lean, you're either not getting enough fuel, or too much air.

Your brake pedal idle up tells me you're closing a vacuum leak. And your backfire issue tells me lean condition, so your O2 is probably correct.
 
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CzyRanger

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Code 41 can be a bear.

Please read:


You're on the right track. Odds are it's either an O2 issue, an O2 wiring issue, or a vacuum leak. If it is O2, I had good luck with the Bosch ones Rock Auto carries before I went to a Wideband (your 1988 cannot use a Wideband without an aftermarket pcm - don't buy one).

The brake thing really points to vacuum. Pcv valve, air box heater lines, cruise control (if you have it, there's also a cruise control vac line under your brake pedal), brake booster grommets, oil fill cap, fuel tank charcoal canister, fuel tank vapor line... List goes on. Start at your intake plenum and look EVERYWHERE. I'd put money on a missing vac cap or a cracked hose. Plenum gasket is even a possibility.

Lean means either you're not getting enough fuel, or too much air foe the fuel your pcm is injecting. Three things make "vrooms:" air, fuel, spark. If you know you're lean, you're either not getting enough fuel, or too much air.

Your brake pedal idle up tells me you're closing a vacuum leak. And your backfire issue tells me lean condition, so your O2 is probably correct.
@PetroleumJunkie412
Thanks for the info! Much appreciated! So I'm going to tear it down and see what I can find here in a little. So is it safe to say that since I drove with the 02 sensor unplugged with no changes in the condition that the 02 sensor is good? Also... Not sure if it makes a difference or not but the backfires are more so a popping kind of noise and sound like they are coming from right after the 02 sensor where the exhaust flange meets on the passenger side. I also do have a oil leak. I suspect it's the valve cover gaskets. But Everytime I drive it it smokes from both sides by the rear of the exhaust manifold where the exhaust hooks up. Sorry for rambling. Just trying to get as much info on it to you all as possible. Thanks again for the help!
 

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You might have some luck locating a vacuum leak by doing the following:

  1. Turn on your engine and lift the hood of your vehicle. Locate the intake manifold....
  2. Open the valve of a propane torch but DO NOT LIGHT IT....
  3. Run the tip of the propane torch along your intake manifold, checking for vacuum leaks in various locations such as the tubes and gaskets....
  4. Listen for a change in your engine's idling.
 

CzyRanger

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Okay guys... Got a video of where I'm at. Need a little guidance on where I should go from here. Thanks again for all the help.
 

CzyRanger

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One more status update... Im at a halt. Don't know where to go from here. Or what would be best I should say. Please see the videos I've uploaded. Thank you guys.
 

PetroleumJunkie412

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Valve covers leak on 2.9s. The blue felpro gaskets fix this. There is a very light torque spec on it.

Do not take the lower intake off. You do.t need to.

You are running lean. I.will bet you do not have a fuel pressure issue beyond dirty injectors. Those exhaust pops are lean condition. I set my engine up to do this when I'm on decel intentionally. I like the sound. But I did it by setting my air fuel ratio up to 16.5-19.6 in order to cause it. Lean=pops. That tells me tour O2 is working and your computer is working to control O2.

The best thing you can do right now.is pull your fuel rail and clean your injectors. That will get the "it has to he a fuel problem" line of thinking out of your head.


Bird is right with his propane torch advice.

Your exhaust manifolds probably leak. This is a pain in the ass to fix. I have extra manifolds if yours are rotted out.
 
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PetroleumJunkie412

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Did you read the link I sent?

So far, you're tearing way too far into it.

Only advice I cab give is to clean your injectors, put everything back together and do the propane test. Only way you'll know.

We can't help much unless we have some diagnostics. All we have so far is an engine code and some engine e video. 🤷🏿‍♂️
 
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CzyRanger

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Did you read the link I sent?

So far, you're tearing way too far into it.

Put everything back together and do the propane test. Only way you'll know.

We can't help much unless we have some diagnostics. All we have so far is an engine code and some engine e video. 🤷🏿‍♂️
Yes sir, I read the link you provided. I will get it back together and provide some tests. Got to get a propane torch tomorrow but I will post results once I do. Thanks again.
 


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