Another slave cylinder thread...


cmattina

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I guess i am wondering if i should bleed the system. i am getting somewhat conflicting info on how to do it.

this link seems to be straight forward but does not mention anything about turning the master upside down and pumping it: https://www.therangerstation.com/how-to/transmission-transfer-case-driveshaft/bleed-a-hydraulic-clutch/

On the note of the master... do i turn it upside a pump it with the reservoir cap off or on? Does this process need to be followed by the one above or does it come after the one above?
 


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cmattina

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Ahh, i just looked at your leak photo and there is no exhaust pipe there
Oh, so i wont need to pull do anything with the exhaust? I'm confused.. again
 

Josh B

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Actually i use my handy dandy freight harbor tools el cheapo tranny jack on the transfer case too, mostly for balance and support the weight while I take it loose and put it back.
There are numerous tests you can use, There's also a more definitive check of the pilot bearing but I didn't see where it was earlier. Basically it comes down to the transmission fully disengaging with the clutch pedal fully pressed, that is where you could hear a problem with the pilot bearing, and is the only time the pilot bearing is really working at all
I understand you not wanting it to be down right now, but I think you're at a place where you should assemble a clutch kit pressure plate and pilot bearing should be in it too, Slave cylinder kit(throwout bearing included) and the gaskets, paper gasket for transfer case(probably 6 hole, one is actually the vent hole, depending on your TC) donut gasket for tailpipe, 3 hole gasket catalytic converter to y-pipe, and donut for each exhaust pipe to manifold.
Still, when i looked at your leak photo i saw no pipes there??

At least if you get everything ready, including trans fluid, and it breaks down you'll be ready to tear it down
 

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alwaysFlOoReD

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I dont seem to have those symptoms...

I did lazy man's test. Truck parked on slight incline, put it in gear, started it, left clutch in and it rolled. Rolled at same speed as when in neutral. So, at that specific time it seemed to be working properly...
Did you try the same test when facing the opposite direction? Perhaps there is slight engagement of clutch but if you're rolling in the same direction as the clutch is trying to push you then the test is inconclusive. Setting up the same test and see if you get the same results when the truck is facing the other way.
 

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I simply don't see a pipe across your transmission, they must have totally changed that for later models. If there is no exhaust pipe in the way, you won't have to mess with it.

If your hydraulic clutch system is the same as earlier ones, and you need to fully bleed it, about the only way I've found is to pull the entire unit (mine that includes getting the brake booster cylinder out of the way as well, not really that hard to do once you get it figured out), hang the entire unit up high enough for it to stretch out straight down, fill it, wiggle every hose in it until all air bubbles are gone, then reinstall as a complete unit.

I last used a power torque slave kit, which has been altered from the Ford clutch slave removal tool, it uses a plain spring clip which pulls easily with a screw driver and pushes easily back in after you push the tube in past the lock collar(you can see it clear using a light) simply hold it in place and slip the clip back in. I like that system better than the Ford removal tool one
 

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I am convinced you have a clutch/slave system problem, you might get around it for awhile but not indefinitely, soon enough you'll be faced with repairs.
But then I've been driving mine around two months now knowing the bearing is barely hanging in, enough to know it's cost me 4 mpg on at least a dozen fill-ups, but I just shift careful and baby it through the rough spots, mostly 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, after getting to highway speeds in 4th and 5th it smooths out for cruising, but getting there is kinda slow
 

cmattina

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Did you try the same test when facing the opposite direction? Perhaps there is slight engagement of clutch but if you're rolling in the same direction as the clutch is trying to push you then the test is inconclusive. Setting up the same test and see if you get the same results when the truck is facing the other way.
I will try that. if i recall, i was in 1st rolling backwards though...
 
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cmattina

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I am convinced you have a clutch/slave system problem, you might get around it for awhile but not indefinitely, soon enough you'll be faced with repairs.
But then I've been driving mine around two months now knowing the bearing is barely hanging in, enough to know it's cost me 4 mpg on at least a dozen fill-ups, but I just shift careful and baby it through the rough spots, mostly 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, after getting to highway speeds in 4th and 5th it smooths out for cruising, but getting there is kinda slow

I found a video of a guy bleeding the master on youtube. he take it out of firewall, and then tilts it up and takes the plunger out, and puts the plunger back in. Is that bleeding the whole system or just the master?

Here is a pic of my slave. it looked pretty dry in there.

20190905_125453.jpg
 

alwaysFlOoReD

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I found a video of a guy bleeding the master on youtube. he take it out of firewall, and then tilts it up and takes the plunger out, and puts the plunger back in. Is that bleeding the whole system or just the master?

Here is a pic of my slave. it looked pretty dry in there.

View attachment 31032
Just the master.
 

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cmattina

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Thanks

somewhat related... i did a quick test with my hand on the clutch pedal. It was quite hard, definitely had to get my body weight behind it. The final 25-30% though it was softer. should it be consistently hard the whole time? is this a sign of anything? TBH it could have just FELT soft because the angle was better when it is further to the floor...
 
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cmattina

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Actually i use my handy dandy freight harbor tools el cheapo tranny jack on the transfer case too, mostly for balance and support the weight while I take it loose and put it back.
There are numerous tests you can use, There's also a more definitive check of the pilot bearing but I didn't see where it was earlier. Basically it comes down to the transmission fully disengaging with the clutch pedal fully pressed, that is where you could hear a problem with the pilot bearing, and is the only time the pilot bearing is really working at all
I understand you not wanting it to be down right now, but I think you're at a place where you should assemble a clutch kit pressure plate and pilot bearing should be in it too, Slave cylinder kit(throwout bearing included) and the gaskets, paper gasket for transfer case(probably 6 hole, one is actually the vent hole, depending on your TC) donut gasket for tailpipe, 3 hole gasket catalytic converter to y-pipe, and donut for each exhaust pipe to manifold.
Still, when i looked at your leak photo i saw no pipes there??

At least if you get everything ready, including trans fluid, and it breaks down you'll be ready to tear it down
thinking of this: https://www.rockauto.com/en/moreinfo.php?pk=4696437&cc=1442105&jsn=251 I think that includes pilot bearing?

and this: https://www.autopartsway.ca/partlist.cfm?ford/2008/ranger/xlt/4.0l-v6/allb/transmission-and-transaxle-~-manual/manual-transmission-components/clutch-release-bearing-and-slave-cylinder-assembly/pagenum1/tabs

The pipe that could block is at the rear of the transmission. I do not recognize the non donut gasket.

What about fly wheel?
 

Josh B

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I'd still go with a new slave cylinder too. That's what caused me to have to put the next clutch/slave,bearing in mine. They did a $600 clutch replacement and put it back together with an old ($35 for new) slave cylinder.

That bleed technique you linked to is identical to the one in my Ford repair manual, and it Will Not Work on mine, the bubbles Cannot be fully removed using that process. When you get your clutch kit there should be a number to tech help with the directions, highly suggesting all Ranger projects, some other models too, call before beginning work for details. They'll explain it fully. i didn't see those notes before doing mine, found it would Not bleed the old way, and since I'd already jammed the pushrod into the locking clip, had to pull my booster cylinder too, in order to get the master clutch cylinder out intack. The fluid line from the master to the slave is a real pita getting out, but then again, very possible, just takes some twisting and squirming to work it through there, and back in. You'll see if you have to do this, the sound of those bubbles all coming up with it stretched straight down is a good sound if you've been through it trying the other way.
I was by myself too when pulling the line through the frame/fenderwell/ engine area too, and needed someone to pull it on up as I fed it through, because it was jamming up on mine. Wound up with an old screen door spring wired onto the line down low and stretched up near top of the hood and wired on up there, pulled it right on out :)
After you get the line bled and fed back into place, secured and ready to go, hook it up to the slave, open the slave bleeder, and it will complete the bleed process with gravity flow(just keep that reservoir topped up)
 

cmattina

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I'd still go with a new slave cylinder too. That's what caused me to have to put the next clutch/slave,bearing in mine. They did a $600 clutch replacement and put it back together with an old ($35 for new) slave cylinder.

That bleed technique you linked to is identical to the one in my Ford repair manual, and it Will Not Work on mine, the bubbles Cannot be fully removed using that process. When you get your clutch kit there should be a number to tech help with the directions, highly suggesting all Ranger projects, some other models too, call before beginning work for details. They'll explain it fully. i didn't see those notes before doing mine, found it would Not bleed the old way, and since I'd already jammed the pushrod into the locking clip, had to pull my booster cylinder too, in order to get the master clutch cylinder out intack. The fluid line from the master to the slave is a real pita getting out, but then again, very possible, just takes some twisting and squirming to work it through there, and back in. You'll see if you have to do this, the sound of those bubbles all coming up with it stretched straight down is a good sound if you've been through it trying the other way.
I was by myself too when pulling the line through the frame/fenderwell/ engine area too, and needed someone to pull it on up as I fed it through, because it was jamming up on mine. Wound up with an old screen door spring wired onto the line down low and stretched up near top of the hood and wired on up there, pulled it right on out :)
After you get the line bled and fed back into place, secured and ready to go, hook it up to the slave, open the slave bleeder, and it will complete the bleed process with gravity flow(just keep that reservoir topped up)
Thanks! So essentially, you snaked the pressure line between the master and slave out from the engine bay or wheel well area?
I am going to assume this is the process:
?

Honestly, i think the smartest thing for me to do is give it a good bleed, following this procedure to a T, rather than pulling the tranny.
 


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