Correcting an old neglected engine (and everything else)


mattjon

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Hi all, first post on here, sorry it's long, trying to give context:

1999 ford ranger 4x4, 4.0L with 208k miles and manual trans overheated last week. I filled up the coolant, let it cool, and kept going (I know, shouldn't have, but did). It overheated again about 30 miles later, blowing the head gasket according to a mechanic. Didn't see the exhaust, it was very late at night, but I'm sure it was full of white smoke. The oil is milky now, and a friend said I might have cracked the block. It will start barely, but doesn't run smooth.

Before I let it overheat, the transmission was starting to slip/act up, it wobbled quite a bit over 75mph despite a relatively new front end, there was a bunch of rust in the coolant, and it was getting poor gas mileage (~12miles/gallon). It sounded like it was reving higher than it was (while the odometer was normal), as if it was about to take off or it was working super hard. Not sure what that sound was. Several relatively savvy friends couldn't identify it either. I wasn't doing appropriate upkeep, obviously, hoping to correct that if it is worth it.

Here is my plan that I'd love for y'all to weigh in on, not that I've done all this before, but feel confident I can figure it out:
1. wet compression test - I think the block probably isn't cracked if it runs, is that true?
2. pull off heads, visual inspection, replace gasket, new heads if needed. What else should I replace at this step, sensors?
3. flush radiator to get rust out
4. check "new" water pump to make sure its working
5. check timing chain (can I do this without pulling the engine? I haven't researched this step yet...) -- thinking this might be a problem because of the miles on the engine, the "reving" noise, and poor gas mileage.
6. start fixing the other things from before

Or I sell the thing for next to nothing... but that sounds like less fun. I'm not looking for a long term project truck or anything, but would like to get it reliably operational. Open to any and all advice.


matt
 


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rusty ol ranger

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1- Itll run with a cracked block. But i highly doubt thats an issue and probably wouldnt show up in a compression test anyways unless it cracked a bore. Chances are its a head/head gasket.

2- Heads, gaskets, lifters, cam if youre in it that deep for the timing chain. Valves, springs, pushrods, etc.

3- Just replace it.

4- Water pumps either work or they dont, as long as the shaft doesnt wobble on the new one you should be fine.

5- Wouldnt hurt to check/replace, but there are numerous other things that can cause this.

6- Personally if it were me id just find a good 4.0 in the junkyard and drop it in. Youll be ahead. Change the radiator/hoses/heater core and keep on truckin.
 

alwaysFlOoReD

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Agree on #6.
 

mattjon

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6- Personally if it were me id just find a good 4.0 in the junkyard and drop it in. Youll be ahead. Change the radiator/hoses/heater core and keep on truckin.
Ok, that makes sense. I'll start looking for a new 4.0. Gotta do more research and find an engine hoist to borrow...

With a new engine put in, anything else I should replace while I'm at it?
 

Uncle Gump

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The sound you heard was most likely a bad fan clutch.
 

Uncle Gump

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You should probably do a clutch job while it's all apart... just doesn't make any sense not to.
 

alwaysFlOoReD

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Manual trans...new clutch kit including the slave cylinder.
Replace the rad, its probably 1/3 clogged with rust.
Replace the heater core.
Replace brake fluid. You already know about checking the front end because wobble. Unless really financially broke replace front end parts in pairs.
 

mattjon

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Got it, thanks all. Will replace front end components in pairs as suggested.

Absolute musts:
Radiator and tubes
Heater core
All fluids
Fan clutch

Secondary, but should probably do to take advantage of having it all apart:
Clutch and slave cylinder


Open to other thoughts if anyone has stuff to add.
 


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