Gear change questions


craveman85

Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2009
Messages
422
Reaction score
1
Points
18
Age
31
Location
new york
Vehicle Year
2008, 1981
Make / Model
ford, AMC
Engine Size
2.3l, 2.5
Transmission
Manual
I've got an 8.8 for my 2008 rwd 4 cylinder that I plan on changing gears in and adding new bearings. I've read that if you use Ford racing gears and bearings then you don't need to use a pinion depth gauge and such. Have any of you had any personal experience with this working like Ford says? I plan on putting in either 4.30 or 4.56 and running 245/75r16s. I have a lot of hills and tow my boat a lot so either of those should be better than what I'm running now.
 


Rock Auto 5% Discount Code: CFB3B5F7F32B37 Expires: March 30, 2020

tinman_72

Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2008
Messages
316
Reaction score
19
Points
18
Location
North Georgia
Vehicle Year
1993
Make / Model
Ford
Engine Type
2.3 (4 Cylinder)
Engine Size
2.5
Transmission
Manual
2WD / 4WD
2WD
Total Lift
Factory
Total Drop
None
Tire Size
255/60R15
My credo
I like cookies.
Sorry, you always have to use "pinion depth gauge and such" regardless of which brand gears you use. I have heard of people using the same shims as was taken out but I have never seen that work firsthand.
 

French-connection

New member
Joined
Aug 12, 2017
Messages
52
Reaction score
1
Points
0
Location
SC
Vehicle Year
2002
Make / Model
Ford
Engine Size
4.0
Transmission
Automatic
I just did a full rebuild on my rear axle.
I followed the Ford installation instructions and things worked out quite well.
You'll definitely need to set it up taking measurements for backlash and wear pattern (which will determine pinion depth).
My biggest problem was to actually add the shims to preload the carrier bearings. If you can make a final single shim in the correct thickness for each side, it'll save you some headaches.
I'd also say that since you'll change gear size, your previous setup becomes obsolete and you really have to measure everything to avoid any gear whining once the axle is back in action.
There are a couple good videos out there that give good pointers on the rebuild.
One good tip is to grind the ID of the old inner pinion bearing so it slides on the new shaft without press fit. It'll make the task to set and adjust the pinion depth much easier.

Olivier
 

Captain Ledd

Well-known member
Article Contributor
V8 Engine Swap
Joined
Aug 7, 2007
Messages
2,381
Reaction score
37
Points
48
Location
Michigan
Vehicle Year
1984, 1997
Make / Model
Ford
Engine Size
302, 2.3
Transmission
Manual
My credo
If you're not making mistakes, you're not learning.
You don't NEED a depth gauge, but it will save some time playing with shims until you get it right. I never used one on mine and I've put a good 30k on it.

Start with the original shim stack and go from there.
 

adsm08

Senior Master Grease Monkey
Supporting Member
Ford Technician
TRS 20th Anniversary
Joined
Sep 20, 2009
Messages
32,465
Reaction score
1,752
Points
113
Location
Dillsburg PA
Vehicle Year
1987
Make / Model
Ford
Engine Type
4.0 V6
Engine Size
4.0
Transmission
Manual
2WD / 4WD
4WD
Tire Size
31X10.50X15
The reason you don't "need" the pinion depth gauge with Ford gears (and I do not understand why this tool supposedly doesn't work with aftermarket brands of gears) is that you install the pinion with a "setup bearing" on it, then bolt a tube in place of the carrier, and use a set of feelers to measure the distance between the pinion and the tube. That measurement tells you the shim you need.

It's not that you don't need to take a reading, you just use a different set of tools.
 


Top