Is a SAS the only option?


1slow5oh

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argueing over which system is 'better' is a rediculous as argueing overwhether pizza is better than chocolate bars.
whether it's live axle,ttb,sla,strut or whatever you have....they all have their place.

having said that,could you please explain this line?
I'm retarted for using a big anchor of a axle....:icon_hornsup:
 


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CHKNFKR

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This is why I'm a straight axle retard


5-ton on the left, chromo d60 stub on the right. thats what it takes to turn a 500# wheel and tire combo.
 

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^ his IS bigger
 

BlackBII

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So...now we are comparing 5 ton axles to the D60 and D35/44?

Missing the point of the article, boys.

Which was very well written, btw. :icon_thumby:
 

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I find this pretty funny really. If you lived where I live and opted for SAS, you'd get the bad end of the trash talk. I do not care how big your u-joints are, the comparison is irrelevant. I've only owned 2 4 wheel drive vehicles. I already know that I am going to hate the extra unsprung weight when it comes to valving the shocks on my truck. There is just so many more variables to suspension then a setting a pinion angle, camber/caster alignment and spring rates.

How many of the straight axle guys are building 4 links and taking every variable into consideration? Instance center, roll center, and so on and so forth?

The D44 snout and bearing combo is one the most used setups in desert racing. Whether its on a 2WD A-Arm or I-Beam truck or on a TTB truck.

The straight axle has its place...

TTB has is its own also...
 

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It was a very well written post. I will only toss a small bit of my cents into the pot. If you are going to run a non bead locked or non aired down high traction tire than by all means keep the IFS and with some small work you will have a competent comfortable light trail and DD.

But if you are going to go to a str8 axle and spend the time and money on parts why would you pass up the strength and piece of mind having a 1 ton axle? Hell you can find paired ton axles out of CUCV for as low as 500 a pair. Thats a D60 front and 14B w locker rear with 4.10s.

In my humble opinion bypass the D44 all together and go str8 to a D60. Pay once and never have to worry about larger tires or adding a V8.
 

bilzy7

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So with a 99 4x4, I'm trying to research what I can do to front. I'm gonna read up on the ways to add more wheel travel but I'm tryin to add like 3-4 to front only. Anyone know where specs for front end conversions or ways to "mod" a 99 might be? I'm trying not to blow my whole 3k I got left on front end suspension. If you do thanks, I've gotten like no responses for some insight. Other then go buy a 97... Lol
 

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If you have an off road only rig does the issues with the steering alignment come into play? I've heard different opinion on weather the "bump steering" issues can effect traction.

I've got a BRII with about 4" of suspension lift and 4" of body lift. I know when I'm doing hill climbs it seems like I work the steering more than the people with SAS.

On a second note, what locker is the best fit for the TTB setup? Right now I'm welded (bought it that way) and I don't like the way it binds up when turning. I just know it's going to break something at anytime.
 

59bisquik

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If you have an off road only rig does the issues with the steering alignment come into play? I've heard different opinion on weather the "bump steering" issues can effect traction.
When I first setup my SAS I had the trackbar angle wrong and had some bumpsteer. Offroad, it was not noticable but highway speeds was another story all together.
On a second note, what locker is the best fit for the TTB setup? Right now I'm welded (bought it that way) and I don't like the way it binds up when turning. I just know it's going to break something at anytime.
When I ran TTB, I had an Auburn ECTED electric locker. It was horrible and never actually locked, basically just a limited slip. Not a recommended product. I now run a SAS and use a Lockrite. Pros: Locks every time, bullet proof, reliable and easy. Cons: In heavy rocks or slabs like Moab or parts of the Rubicon, it doesnt seem to unlock and feels like a spool. Its better than a welded unit since it does unlock occasionally. Overall, I am happy with it.

While I wont get into which is better...TTB vs SAS since I like both. SAS does have an advantage of a better aftermarket. While you can get custom chromo axles and joints etc for a TTB, they are spendy and special order. The SAS axles on the other hand are normally on the shelf and thus less expensive and easier to get.
 
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If you have an off road only rig does the issues with the steering alignment come into play? I've heard different opinion on weather the "bump steering" issues can effect traction.

I've got a BRII with about 4" of suspension lift and 4" of body lift. I know when I'm doing hill climbs it seems like I work the steering more than the people with SAS.
If your steering linkage isn't aligned well (is out of phase) with your beams, the bumpsteer will for sure force you to make corrections, especially on a steep hillclimb where weight-shift causes the suspension to unload some (pulling the tires toed-in). If real bad, it'll affect traction too, yes (the tires are pushing & fighting each other for the direction they want to take the frontend of your rig).

I definitely would suggest taking some corrective action on it, especially since you are noticing the effects of it.
A steering option I don't think was mentioned yet in this post is Stonecrusher's setup. There's been some discussion on it recently in the Fabrication forum (I think it was) here (also search the Steering section too). Simple, a bit crude (IMO), but very effective setup. Stonecrusher only offers the setup with heim ends, though several users here have replicated it using standard tierod ends.
 

84EB

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What I would like to see is someone try to link a TTB instead of radius arms. I hate radius arms.
 

Mutant Pony

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I would like to add: It depends on what you do, primarily, offroad.
Rock crawling: A heavier duty front end is required as well as the straight axle just plain works better.
Mud bogging: Although the ttb may gain a traction advantage in 'the rough', it becomes a wall in deep mud. The round tube of the straight axle doesn't.
If all you do is trail ride, The TTB is a FAR better front axle!! The independent suspension provides a better contact patch then a straight axle is capable of. The main benefit being that niether side is affected by the other.
Dunes, sand: definatly the TTB!!
 

84EB

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If all you do is trail ride, The TTB is a FAR better front axle!! The independent suspension provides a better contact patch then a straight axle is capable of. The main benefit being that niether side is affected by the other.
Please explain. The wheels on a TTB travel in an arch when moving up and down. May be a little different than a straight axle, but I just don't see it being enough to make a difference.
 

Mutant Pony

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True, the contact patch benefit of a ttb over a straight axle is small. As I said, the main benefit being the separation of sides which improves ride more than anything.
If you like being beat to death by your truck, the straight axle is for you!!!
I have both. My poor old '84 doesn't get driven much. With a much bigger motor and much more aggresive tires the only place it has an advantage over my '86 is in the mud.
 

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Please explain. The wheels on a TTB travel in an arch when moving up and down. May be a little different than a straight axle, but I just don't see it being enough to make a difference.
I'm with this guy.

Contact patch is determined by tire size, not axle type.
 


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